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Listing that Attracts Tenants
As a landlord, you can have the perfect property in the best location with the most sought after amenities, but if you fail to write a listing that attracts the right tenants, you’re leaving profit on the table. Attracting the right tenant can genuinely make or break your investment property.
With a compelling rental listing, you’re enticing them with an introduction to their ideal new home and lifestyle. Your listing can sell them on your property, and, in turn, a prospective renter will be motivated to pay the rent you demand, happily signing on as your new tenant.
So, how to create a rental listing that attracts tenants? By following these simple do’s and don’ts, you’ll find your property practically leases itself.   

Attention-Grabbing Headline:

Create a headline that packs a punch by listing one or two specific features that your ideal tenant is seeking. Some amenities to include in the headline are the number of bedrooms and bathrooms, type of housing, the neighborhood or town, best physical features such as large windows or 9’ ceilings, and more.


Do:
$2500/2BR Open Concept Apartment near Wrigley Field. Washer/Dryer in Unit.
Don’t:
$2500/2BR Large Unit in Great Location.

High-Quality Photos:

Spend the time taking, or hiring a professional to take, high-quality photos of your property. While it may seem unnecessary, it’s a crucial part of creating a sought after listing. Allow prospective tenants to get excited about your property; let them visualize their new life there, and when you do, they’ll be happy to pay the rent it deserves.
When browsing prospective rentals, tenants spend approximately 60% of their time viewing pictures. That’s why high-quality images are so vital. It’s important to include photographs of every room, including common spaces and outdoor spaces. While these two are often overlooked, they can be massive selling points. Often, people forget to include the outside of their building or home on the listing, but this is crucial.

Do:
Take photos during the day with natural sunlight and table lamps on.
Edit for quality.
Stand at the widest point of the room (the corner), including two walls, a bit of ceiling and floor. 
Don’t:
Overuse overhead lighting or close the curtains.
Edit or alter your images to be misleading.
Appear in the photos in reflections.
Take pictures of a dirty or cluttered unit.

Financial Details:

Many listings include the rent amount in the headline, but this isn’t mandatory. Some landlords are flexible on the rate or prefer not to lead with the price. If you choose not to include it in the headline, be sure you specify in the listing the rent or the rent range, if you’re open, as well as the security deposit required. You can either specify this with an amount or write 1.5 months’ rent, for example. Remember, there are laws surrounding security deposits that you must follow. Check your local laws here.

Other Considerations:

When listing your property, it’s important to keep in mind your ideal tenant. Write the listing that that type of person wants to read. Convey how their ideal lifestyle is within reach, if only they rent your property.
Another reminder –– always phrase things positively. Prospective tenants are looking for the property that will give them the most of their “must-haves”, and, hopefully, a few extras. Sell them on all of the amenities your property has to offer, and leave off what isn’t included –– people don’t want to hear what they’re not getting.
As always, be sure you’re following local and state laws, fairly representing your property, and never discriminating against prospective tenants. Remember, just because you have an ideal tenant in mind does not mean it’s okay to discriminate or craft a listing that states who you want to live there. This is illegal.
Do:
Chef’s kitchen with SS appliances.
Top-rated school district.

Don’t:
No central air conditioning.
Laundry not included.
No children allowed.

By following these simple tricks, you’ll create a listing that attracts tenants that you want to lease your property to –– and who are willing to pay the rent that your property deserves.
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